SamPortraitDoubleSometimes it s a hard decision between Black & White or Colour. This shot was an opportunistic shot of a work colleague at a local outing so the framing is a little out. The colour shot is basically unprocessed except for a little vibrancy and grain added using Camera RAW. The Black & White is the Colour converted and a white vignette added using Photoshop. All comments, criticism and tips for improvements are welcome.

Lake2This last weekend I gave away my eldest daughter. In these modern times it more symbolic, but in ancient times, it was very common for female children to have either arranged marriages or be purchased by their future groom so-to-speak. The root word “wedd” of Anglo-Saxon derivation actually means a “pledge” or “vow”. This either referred to the groom vowing to marry the woman or it meant the barter money or trade agreement with the bride’s father for his daughter. The actual word wedding refers to a “wager”. Therefore, the bride’s father would setup a type of contract with the groom that he would barter for land, social status, or even political reputation, which back then was as significant as it is today.

A female child in those days was known to be property of her father and so the transferring of “ownership” to her groom on her wedding day was indeed a legality. The tradition of “giving away” would signify that the bride’s family would no longer have control over her or her possessions (dowry) and that her husband would respectfully take on the responsibilities and obligations that her father once boasted.

The tradition of taking his hand and placing the groom’s on the bride’s is symbolic of the “passing” of his property or duty.

Thanks go to Kathy Steinhardt of Treasure Pics http://www.treasurepics.com.au

CapturingLightA spider web, spiderweb, spider’s web, or cobweb (from the archaic word coppe, meaning “spider”) is a device created by a spider out of proteinaceous spider silk extruded from its spinnerets. Spider webs have existed for at least 100 million years, as witnessed in a rare find of Early Cretaceous amber from Sussex, southern England. Insects can get trapped in spider webs, providing nutrition to the spider; however, not all spiders build webs to catch prey, and some do not build webs at all. “Spider web” is typically used to refer to a web that is apparently still in use (i.e. clean), whereas “cobweb” refers to abandoned (i.e. dusty) webs. Ref:Wikipedia